From the Bishop’s Desk: Dimensions of Reformation History

I am writing to invite you to consider seriously participation in a very special event that is part of the synod’s commemoration of the 500th anniversary of the Reformation

With support from the Synod Council, the ELCA World Hunger Education unit, the German Embassy and several congregations in the synod, a unique – and hopefully stimulating – theological symposium has been planned for Friday, November 6 (beginning at 5 p.m.) through Saturday, November 7 (concluding at 1 p.m.) at Lutheran Church of the Reformation on Capitol Hill.

We’ve called it “Forgotten Luther” because it highlights a dimension of Reformation history that has not received a great deal of attention in our theological education. Yet it is rooted in biblical theology and in the history of the reform movement.

For those of you seeking ways your congregation might respond to the challenges of our time, especially poverty, racism and income disparity, the five theologians presenting at "Forgotten Luther" have something very important to say.
For those of you seeking ways one might respond to the challenges of our time, especially poverty, racism and income disparity, the five theologians presenting at “Forgotten Luther” have something very important to say.

For those of you seeking ways one might respond to the challenges of our time, especially poverty, racism and income disparity, the five theologians presenting at “Forgotten Luther” have something very important to say.

Some of you will know Cynthia Moe-Lobeda from her time in D.C. She has become a globally-recognized theologian, now a professor at Pacific Lutheran Theological Seminary. Gordon “Tim” Huffman has been a pioneer in Lutheran-based liberation theology. Samuel Torvend of Pacific Lutheran University has written an eye-opening study, Luther and the Hungry Poor. Jon Pahl of Lutheran Theological Seminary at Philadelphia will build a bridge from the Catechisms to the streets of America. The prophet voice behind the movement to recover ‘the forgotten Luther’ is Carter Lindberg of Boston University, who will give the keynote after a catered ‘Beer and Brats’ dinner.

Download a flyer or bulletin insert for yourself, and share one with a friend or others in your congregation. And reserve tickets. The registration fee will help us pay for the event, but those unable to pay the full cost will also be most welcome. Scholarships are available.

Let me note that the ELCA World Hunger Education unit will be videotaping parts of the event in the preparation of educational material for use in congregations. Your presence at the event would certainly strengthen this effort.


* The original version of this message was distributed to rostered leaders of the synod on 9/24/15.

Stay

Sign Up For Our Newsletter

Leave a Reply

Close Menu